HRM: Use of Motion to Stay

A motion to stay is a request that either temporarily or permanently prohibits a pending court proceeding or legal action. A motion to stay is typically made on the behalf of one or both sides of an argument. It is very common, especially in divorce cases, but can be used in many other types of civil and criminal cases as well. For example, if someone wants to challenge the legality of his or her current marriage, they can use a motion to stay to prevent the courts from determining the validity of the marriage until the courts have heard and decided the case. If someone wants to prevent the police from investigating and arresting someone they feel is committing a crime, they can use a motion to stay to prevent the police from doing so.

Stay

Motion to stay interviews are not very common but can be useful for a variety of different reasons. Hiring managers may use them when interviewing potential employees, coaches may use them occasionally as a way to help them keep focused during one-on-one coaching, and HR management might use them to limit the scope of an employee’s disciplinary actions. Some types of motions to stays are quite specific, while others are less specific. For example, a request for temporary restraint order is very specific, while a request for a preliminary injunction is not.

If you are not a staff member of an employer, a stay interview is probably not something that you would consider a great place to try to recruit or hire a new employee. However, if you happen to run a small business with a small staff, you could use this type of motion to get your employee’s attention. A stay interview can be a good recruiting tool, if done right and if you know the specific circumstances surrounding it. Hiring a staff member with a great motion to stay rating can help you get a lot of extra attention from current employees and might help bring someone in who would not have worked for you otherwise.